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Resolutions adopted by the United Nations

on Cyprus, regarding Famagusta

  1. Resolution 550 (1984)

Adopted by the Security Council on 11 May 1984

 

The Security Council,

Having considered the situation in Cyprus at the request of the Government of the Republic of Cyprus,

Having heard the statement made by the President of the Republic of Cyprus,

Taking note of the report of the Secretary – General (S/16519),

Recalling its resolutions 365 (1974), 367 (1975), 541 (1983) and 544 (1983),

Deeply regretting the non-implementation of its resolutions, in particular resolution 541 (1983),

Gravely concerned about the further secessionist acts in the occupied part of the Republic of Cyprus which are in violation of resolution 541 (1983), namely the purported “exchange of Ambassadors” between Turkey and the legally invalid “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” and the contemplated holding of a “Constitutional referendum” and “elections”, as well as the other actions or threats of actions aimed at further consolidating the purported independent state and the division of Cyprus,

Deeply concerned about recent threats for settlement of Varosha by people other than its inhabitants,

Reaffirming its continuing support for the United Nations Peace-keeping Force in Cyprus,

v     Reaffirms its resolution 541 (1983) and calls for its urgent and effective implementation.

v     Condemns all secessionist actions, including the purported exchange of Ambassadors between Turkey and the Turkish Cypriot leadership, declares them illegal and invalid and calls for their immediate withdrawal.

v     Reiterates the call upon all States not to recognize the purported state of the “Turkish Republic on Northern Cyprus” set up by secessionist acts and calls upon them not to facilitate or in any way assist the aforesaid entity;

v     Calls upon all States to respect the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, unity and non-alignment of the Republic of Cyprus;

v     Considers attempts to settle any part of Varosha by people other than its inhabitants as inadmissible and calls for the transfer of this area to the administration of the United Nations.

v     Considers any attempts to interfere with the status or the deployment of the United Nations Peace-keeping Force in Cyprus as contrary to the resolutions of the United Nations;

v     Requests the Secretary-General to promote the urgent implementation of Security resolution 541 (1983);

v     Reaffirms its mandate of good offices given to the Secretary General and requests him to undertake new efforts to attain an overall solution to the Cyprus problem in conformity with the principles for such a settlement laid down in the pertinent United Nations resolutions, including Security Council resolution 541 (1983) and the present resolution;

v     Calls aupon all parties to cooperate with the Secretary-General in his mission of good offices;

v     Decides to remain seized of the situation with a view to taking urgent and appropriate measures in the event of non-implementation of its resolution 541 (1983) and the present resolution;

v     Requests the Secretary-General to promote the implementation of the resolution and to report thereon to the Security council as developments require.

 

Adopted at the 2539th meeting by 13 votes to 1 (Pakistan) with 1 abstention (United States of America).

 

 

  1. Resolution 789 (1992)

 

Adopted by the Security Council on 25 November 1992

 

The Security Council,

 

Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 19 November 1992 on his mission of good offices in Cyprus (s/24830),

 

Noting with satisfaction that the two leaders discussed all the issues in the Set of Ideas with the result that there were areas of agreement as noted in the report,

Welcoming the agreement by the two sides to meet again with the Secretary-General in early March 1993 to complete the work on an agreed Set of Ideas,

1.      Reaffirms all its previous resolutions on Cyprus, including resolutions 365 (1974), 367 (1975), 541 (1983), 550 (1984) and 774 (1992),

  1. Endorses the report of the Secretary-General and commends him for his efforts,

  2. Reaffirms also its endorsement of the Set of Ideas including the territorial adjustments reflected in the map contained in the annex to the report of the Secretary-General of 21 August 1992 (2/s/24472) as the basis for reaching an overall framework agreement,

  3. Reaffirms further its position that the present status quo is not acceptable and that an overall agreement in line with the Set of Ideas should be achieved without further delay;

  4. Notes that the recent joint meetings did not achieve their intended goal, in particular because certain positions adopted by the Turkish Cypriot side were fundamentally at variance with the Set of Ideas,

  5. Calls upon the Turkish Cypriot side to adopt positions that are consistent with the Set of Ideas on those issues identified by the Secretary-General in his report, and for all concerned to be prepared in the next round of talks to make decisions that will bring about a speedy agreement,

  6. Recognizes that the completion of this process in March 1993 would be greatly facilitated by the implementation by each side of measures designed toi promote mutual confidence;

  7. Urges all concerned to commit themselves to the confidence building measures set out below:

    1. That, as a first step towards the withdrawal of non-Cypriot forces envisaged in the Set of Ideas, the number of foreign troops in the Republic of Cyprus undergo a significant reduction and that a reduction of defence spending be effected in the Republic of Cyprus;

    2. That the military authorities on each side cooperate with the United Nations Peace-keeping Force in Cyprus in order to extend the unmanning agreement of 1989 to all areas of the United Nations-controlled Buffer Zone where the two sides are in close proximity to each other;

    3. That with a view to the implementation of resolution 550 (1984), the area at present under the control of the United Nations Peace-keeping Force in Cyprus be extended to include Varosha;

    4. That each side take active measures to promote people-to-people contact between the two communities by reducing restrictions to the movement of persons across the Buffer Zone;

    5. That restrictions imposed on foreign visitors crossing the Buffer Zone be reduced;

    6. That each side propose bi-communal projects, for possible financing by lending and donor Governments, as well as international institutions;

    7. That both sides commit themselves to the holding of Cyprus-wide census under the auspices of the United nations;

    8. That both sides cooperate to enable the United Nations to undertake, in the relevant locations, feasibility studies (i) in connection with the resettlement and rehabilitation of persons who would be affected by the territorial adjustments as part of the overall agreement, and (ii) in connection with the programme of economic development that would, as part of the overall agreement, benefit those persons who would resettle in the area under Turkish administration;

  8. Requests the Secretary-General to follow up on the implementation of the above confidence-building measures and to keep the Security Council informed as appropriate;

  9.  Also requests the Secretary-General to maintain such preparatory contacts as he considers appropriate before the resumption of the joint meetings in March 1993, and to propose for the Security Council’s consideration revisions in the negotiating format to make it more effective;

  10. Further requests the Secretary-General, during the March 1993 joint meetings, to assess developments on a regular basis with the Council with a view to considering what further action may be needed by the Council;

  11. Requests the Secretary-General to submit a full report after the conclusion of the joint meetings that will resume in March 1993.

 

Adopted at its 3140th meeting,

Letter dated 20 September 1993 from the President of the Security Council addressed to the Secretary-General

“I have the honour to inform you that your report on your mission of good offices in Cyprus dated 14 September 1993 (s/26438) has been considered by the members of the Security Council. 

“The members of the Council have asked me to convey to you their continuing support for your efforts, and those of your Special Representative and Deputy Special Representative. They fully endorse your report and your observation on the current situation. 

The members of the Council reiterate the obligation of both parties to cooperate with you fully and without further delay in reaching promptly an overall framework agreement on the package of proposals and, in the first instance to arrive at an agreement on the package of proposals related to Varosha and Nicosia International Airport which will create climate more conductive to engaging in negotiations on the basis of the Set of Ideas. The members of the Council note with concern that the Turkish Cypriot side has not yet shown the necessary goodwill and cooperation required to achieve an agreement. 

“The members of the Council express their deep disappointment that an agreement on  the package has not yet been reached and agree that you cannot continue your current effort indefinitely. They call on the Turkish Cypriot side t9o give its active support to the effort. 

The members of the Council agree that it is encouraging that there is widespread interest in the package among the Turkish Cypriot community. In this context, they support your proposals to send two technical teams to Cyprus to analyse the implications of the package, in the terms suggested in paragraph 20 of your report, and to identify the requirements for making Nicosia International Airport operational.

 

“The  members of the Council look forward to receiving the report requested in resolution 831 (1993), which will cover the outcome of your further efforts to achieve an agreement on the Varosha and Nicosia International Airport package, including the results of the two technical missions. On the basis of this report the members of the Council will undertake a thorough  review of the situation and, if necessary, consider alternative ways to promote the implementation of the resolutions on Cyprus”.

(signed) Adolfo Raul Taylhardat

President of the Security Council 

Resolution 889 (1993) 

Adopted by the Security Council on 15 December 1993 

The Security Council, 

Recalling its resolution 186 (1964) and other relevant resolutions, 

Having considered the report of the Secretary-General of 22 November 1993 (s/26777 and Add. 1 ) submitted pursuant to resolutions 831 (1993) of 27 May 1993 and 839 (1993) if 11 June 1993 in connection with the Security Council’s comprehensive reassessment of the United Nations operation in Cyprus, 

Noting the recommendation by the Secretary-General that the Security Council extend the stationing of the United Nations Peace-keeping Force in Cyprus in its present strength and structure for a further period of six month,

Noting also tha the Government of Cyprus has agreed that, in view of the prevailing conditions in the island, it is necessary to keep the Force in Cyprus beyond 15 December 1993, 

1.      Extends once more the stationing in Cyprus of the United Nations Peace-keeping Force established under resolution 186 (1964) (UNFICYP) for a further period ending on 15 June 1994;

2.      Notes the Secretary-General’s conclusion that the present circumstances do not allow for any modification in the structure and strength of UNFICYP and requests him to keep those matters under constant review with a view to the further possible restructuring of UNJICYP;

3.      Calls upon the military authorities on both sides to ensure that no incidents occur along the buffer zone and to extend their full cooperation to UNJICYP;

4.      Urges all concerned once again to commit themselves to a significant reduction in the number of foreign troops in the Republic of Cyprus and a reduction of defence spending in the Republic of Cyprus to help restore confidence between the parties and as a first step towards the withdrawal of non-Cypriot forces as set out in the Set of Ideas;

5.      Calls upon the military authorities on both sides, in line with paragraph 3 of resolution 839 (1993) of 11 June 1993, to begin discussions with UNFICYP without further delay with a view to entering into mutual commitments to prohibit along the cease-fire lines live ammunition or weapons other than those which are hand-held and to prohibit also the firing of weapons within sight or hearing of the buffer zone;

6.      Calls upon the military authorities on both sides to cooperate with UNFICYP in extending the 1989unmanning agreement to cover all areas of the buffer zone where the two sides are in close proximity  to each other.

7.      Urges the leaders of both communities to promote tolerence and reconciliation between the two communities as recommended in paragraph 102 of the Secretary-General’s report of 22 November 1993;

8.      Reaffirms that the status quo is unacceptable, and encourages the Secretary-General and his Special Representative to pursue the Secretary-General’s mission of good offices on the basisi of the Set of Ideas and the package of confidence –building measures relating to Varosha and Nicosia International Airport refereed to in paragraph 45 of the Secretary-General’s report on 22 November 1993;

9.      Notes with interest the comfirmation by the team on international economic experts that the package of confidence-building measures holds significant and proportionate benefits for both sides , and looks forward to receiving the full reports of the economic and civil aviation experts;

10.  Welcomes in this context the decision of the Secretary-General to resume intensive contacts with both sides and with others concerned and to concentrate at this stage on achieving an agreement on the package of confidence-building measures, intended to facilitate the political process towards an overall settlement;

11.  Further welcomes the declared support of the Government of Turkey for the package of confidence-building measures, would also welcome a statement of support for that package by the Government of Greece and expresses the hope that rapid progress will now be made on achieving agreement on the package;

12.  Requests the Secretary-General to submit a report by the end of February 1994 on the outcome of his efforts to achieve an agreement on the package of confidence-building measures;

13.  Decides to undertake, on the basis of that report, a thorough review of the situation, including the future role of the United Nations, and, if necessary, to consider alternative ways to promote the implementation of its resolutions on Cyprus.

 

Adopted at its 3322nd meeting.

The situation created by the illegal Turkish invasion of the island of Cyprus in 1974 is clearly one of systematic and continuing violation of human rights in  breach of the purposes and principles of the Charter, and major international instruments. The Government of the Republic of Cyprus has filed a Fourth Application to the European Commission of Human Rights (Application No. 25781/94 Cyprus v. Turkey) contending that the Government of Turkey since 4 October 1983, when the European Commission of Human Rights adopted its Report in respect of Application No. 8007/77, for violations of human rights by Turkey in the areas occupied by the Turkish army in Cyprus continues to commit breaches of the following Articles of the Convention and its First Protocol:

 

  1. Article 1 (General Clause): Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions. No one shall be deprived of his possessions….

Charge laid against Turkey: Greek Cypriots were deprived of their possessions either by eviction or by seizure of movable property and its subsequent removal by Turkish soldiers, or by conditions making abandonment of home and property the only way to safety.

 

  1. Article 2: Everyone’s right to life be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally… .

Charge laid against Turkey: The Turkish army embarked upon a systematic course of mass murders of civilians unconnected with any war activity, including women and babies in arms, and of soldiers who had surrendered.

 

  1. Article 3: No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment………

Charge laid against Turkey: Hundreds of persons, including children, women and elderly people, were the victims of systematic torture and savage and humiliating treatment during their detention by the Turkish army.

 

4.      Article 4: Prohibition of slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour.

 

  1. Article 5: No one shall be deprived of his liberty

Charge laid against Turkey: The Turkish Army forces detained thousands of persons arbitrarily and without lawful authority.

 

  1. Article 6: Right to fair trial by an independent and impartial tribunal

  2. Article 8: Respect of private and family life

  3. Article 9: Freedom of thought, conscience and religion

  4. Article 11: Freedom of assembly and association with others

  5. Article 13: Right to an effec6tive remedy against violations or the rights guaranteed by the Convention